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Roller bearing steel

Fields of use

Parts, which must satisfy high demands for hardness, service life, wear resistance and dimensional stability, such as tools, guardrails, casing, spacer disks, spindles, shafts, rollers, gear wheels, rotating cutters, etc.

Description

The 100Cr6 is the classic steel in the bearing industry. As well as its use for ball bearings, needle bearings and roller bearings, it is also suitable for parts in mechanical engineering that are subject to heavy wear. To do this, it is edge-zone hardened or through-hardened. For larger surface hardnesses, 100CrMo7-3 is suitable.

Properties

Welding:
Roller bearing steels cannot be welded.
Heat treatment:
Normalising: 870° - 900°C with subsequent cooling in air
Soft annealing: 750°C – 800°C soft-annealed, to preserve spheroidite
Stress relief annealing: 600° - 650°C with subsequent cooling in air
Hardening: 80° - 870°C with quenching in oil

Product offers from Stahl-Contor from the Embrach service centre

Material
number
DescriptionDelivery
condition
Dimensions off the shelfTypical applications
1.3505100Cr6+AC35mm to 223mmComponents, for which the following properties are sought-after:
• Major hardness
• Wear resistance
• Endurance limit
• Dimensional stability
• Through-hardened up to approx. D=40mm
1.3536100CrMo7-3+AC60mm to 300mmComponents, for which the following properties are sought-after:
• Major hardness
• Wear resistance
• Endurance limit
• Dimensional stability
Through-hardened up to approx. D=100mm
Factory standardOvako 803 (100Cr6 tube)+ACExternal D = 30 – 200 mmThrough-hardened up to approx. 20mm
Factory standardOvako 824 (100CrMo7-3 tube)+ACExternal D up to 200mmThrough-hardened up to approx. 50mm

 

Pitting

Pitting is the material breakage and near-surface micro-crack formation due to tribological stress. This occurs, for example, with roller bearings and gear wheels.

The formation of pitting due to tribological stress is caused by the local transgression of the strength of the relevant material due to the Hertzian stress between the rolling element and the inner or outer ring of the roller bearing or the tooth flanks of the gear wheels. The fact that the maximum component stress does not occur on the component surface during the Hertzian contact stress, but rather in a characteristic depth beneath the surface is decisive here.
As well as the Hertzian stress, other influencing factors are surface hardness and hardening depth, surface quality, flank profile errors and peripheral speed (for gear wheels), oil viscosity, oil additives, temperature, and similar.

The result of such pitting is very easy to observe on railway tracks: these must be reground from time to time.

Due to the product pages, I think there is a new sub-structure on the main “products” page, the sequence must be defined from the weighting.